Common Safety Measures

June 2, 2007

Safety measures are activities and precautions taken to improve safety, i.e. reduce risk related to human health. Common safety measures include:

  • Visual examination for dangerous situations such as emergency exits blocked because they are being used as storage areas.
  • Visual examination for flaws such as cracks, peeling, loose connections.
  • Chemical analysis
  • X-ray analysis to see inside a sealed object such as a weld, a cement wall or an airplane outer skin.
  • Destructive testing of samples
  • Stress testing subjects a person or product to stresses in excess of those the person or product is designed to handle, to determining the “breaking point”.
  • Safety margins/Safety factors. For instance, a product rated to never be required to handle more than 200 pounds might be designed to fail under at least 400 pounds, a safety factor of two. Higher numbers are used in more sensitive applications such as medical or transit safety.
  • Implementation of standard protocols and procedures so that activities are conducted in a known way.
  • Training of employees, vendors, product users
  • Instruction manuals explaining how to use a product or perform an activity
  • Instructional videos demonstrating proper use of products
  • Examination of activities by specialists to minimize physical stress or increase productivity
  • Government regulation so suppliers know what standards their product is expected to meet.
  • Industry regulation so suppliers know what level of quality is expected. Industry regulation is often imposed to avoid potential government regulation.
  • Self-imposed regulation of various types.
  • Statements of Ethics by industry organizations or an individual company so its employees know what is expected of them.
  • Drug testing of employees, etc.
  • Physical examinations to determine whether a person has a physical condition that would create a problem.
  • Periodic evaluations of employees, departments, etc.
  • Geological surveys to determine whether land or water sources are polluted, how firm the ground is at a potential building site, etc.

From: WikiPedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safety

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